10/12/2018

https://www.frontlive-chrono.com du lundi 10 décembre 2018

Afghanistan : Les attaques des talibans font 20 morts parmi les policiers dans les provinces de Faryab et Farah

 

Syrie: Assassinat à Deraa de l’un des principaux artisans de la réconciliation avec le régime

 

Yémen : L’envoyé de l’ONU a proposé une feuille de route pour le Yémen

 
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18/11/2018

https://www.frontlive-chrono.com du dimanche 18 novembre 2018

Irak .. assassinats en série – Les milices pro-iraniennes montrées du doigt

 

Irak: Les forces de sécurité tuent 10 jihadistes de Daech dans la province de Salahuddin

 

Niger : Deux gendarmes et un civil tués près de la frontière avec le Burkina

 

Syrie: De violents affrontements avec les Jihadistes de l’EI à l’est de l’Euphrate – L’EI menace de mort les fugitifs

 

Syrie: les soldats de l’armée d’Al-Assad ont été la cible de tirs rebelles, tuant 18 d’entre eux

 

Yémen : l’envoyé de l’ONU et les parties au conflit ont accepté de participer à des pourparlers en Suède

 

Yémen : les houthis continuent de mobiliser en dépit des efforts diplomatiques

 
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09/06/2018

Yemen: A military assault on Hodeidah will almost certainly have catastrophic humanitarian impact

Cet article a été aussi publié en : frFrançais (French) arالعربية (Arabic)

A bloody battle just ahead
Yemeni government forces, supported by the Arab Coalition, are preparing to launch an assault on Hodeida, a strategically important port on the Red Sea. This is not the port through which international aid and, according to the Yemeni government and the Coalition, Iranian arms are delivered to the Shiite Houthi rebels.
The problem is that the region is densely populated – about 600,000 inhabitants and displaced. However, the government forces do not seem to be in a position to win quickly over their adversaries, which means that the battle is likely to drag on, making the port inoperable. This means that the blockade of the areas controlled by the Shiite rebels will worsen, which suggests an explosion of the humanitarian catastrophe, already one of the worst the world has known.
For its part, the Arab Coalition draws attention to the risks posed by the Houthis to shipping in the Red Sea, an international communication route of vital importance, at least for Europe. Already, Houthi rebels have repeatedly attacked Saudi oil tankers off Hodeida. It is therefore unlikely that both sides will pay any attention to the UN’s calls for restraint.
A bloody battle in preparation
Yemeni government forces, supported by the Arab Coalition, are preparing to launch an assault on Hodeida, a strategically important port on the Red Sea. This is not the port through which international aid and, according to the Yemeni government and the Coalition, Iranian arms are delivered to the Shiite Houthi rebels.
The problem is that the region is densely populated – about 600,000 inhabitants and displaced. However, the government forces do not seem to be in a position to win quickly over their adversaries, which means that the battle is likely to drag on, making the port inoperable. This means that the blockade of the areas controlled by the Shiite rebels will worsen, which suggests an explosion of the humanitarian catastrophe, already one of the worst the world has known.
For its part, the Arab Coalition draws attention to the risks posed by the Houthis to shipping in the Red Sea, an international communication route of vital importance, at least for Europe. Already, Houthi rebels have repeatedly attacked Saudi oil tankers off Hodeida. It is therefore unlikely that both sides will pay any attention to the UN’s calls for restraint.
UN sounds alarm on Hodeida
Humanitarian agencies in Yemen are deeply worried by the likely impact of a possible military assault on the port city of Hodeidah. The UN and its partners estimate that as many as 600,000 civilians are currently living in and around Hodeidah.
“A military attack or siege on Hodeidah will impact hundreds of thousands of innocent civilians,” said Ms. Lise Grande, the Humanitarian Coordinator for Yemen. “Humanitarian organisations have rushed to develop a contingency plan. In a prolonged worst case, we fear that as many as 250,000 people may lose everything— even their lives.”
In addition to being one of Yemen’s most densely populated areas, Hodeidah is the single most important point of entry for the food and basic supplies needed to prevent famine and a recurrence of a cholera epidemic. Close to 70 percent of Yemen’s imports, including commercial and humanitarian goods, enter through the ports of Hodeidah and Saleef, just to the north of Hodeidah.
Our top priority is helping to ensure the 22 million Yemenis who need some form of humanitarian aid and protection receive the assistance they need,” said Ms. Grande. “Cutting off imports through Hodeidah for any length of time will put Yemen’s population at extreme, unjustifiable risk.”
Across the country, people are desperate for food, medical help and protection. This is why humanitarian organisations have dramatically ramped up the amount of assistance we are providing. Yemen is already the worst humanitarian crisis in the world. With so many lives at stake, absolutely everything has to be done by the parties to the conflict to protect civilians and ensure they have the assistance they need to survive,” said Ms. Grande.
The UN and partners are requesting USD 3 billion through the 2018 Humanitarian Response Plan to support 22.2 million people in need. To date, USD 1.5 billion, half of resources necessary for the year, has been received.

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